Cellar Nerd.

I was playing around with that Beer Cellar website a bit. When you add beers to your cellar it links it to the Beer Advocate page for that beer.

Being the nerd that I am, I followed the link to every beer in my cellar, wrote down their score and averaged them together just to get an idea of how my cellar was shaping up.

I have a “World-Class” cellar, rated at 95.94. That’s kind of neat. I like to think my cellar is modest and full of junk I enjoy drinking, but apparently it’s filled with beer a lot of other people like, too.

Obviously I take what people say on BA with a grain of salt because a lot of people don’t know what they’re talking about, but I feel the general consensus rating wouldn’t be too skewed. Some of the beers in my cellar only had a few reviews, not even enough to have a rating, and some just barely enough to have one. Others had an obscene amount of ratings (BCBS has over 8,000 reviews).

Top 5:

Bottom 5:

I still think my cellar is full of beer I like drinking. I don’t know if I could part with any of it in a trade. I like to think my crown jewel is my 2013 Black Tuesday, but it’s pretty neat I have 2013 and 2014 Parabola in there too. I’m excited I’m at a point where I’ll be having 1-year-old vintages in there now and can start collecting multiple vintages for prolonged cellaring.

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Cellar Season.

I gotta start setting aside some money for cellar purchases this Winter. It’s usually an expensive month with lots of big, boozy stout and other cellarable releases.

  • I’m hoping to double down on my Black Tuesday purchase this year and max out my buying ability with 3 bottles.
  • I also want to get at least another single 4-pack of BCBS and hopefully score some BCBB and BCBCS.
  • I definitely want to pick up a few bottles of this year’s Firestone Walker Anniversary release and batch 2 of Velvet Merkin.
  • I’ll definitely be on the prowl for some Mephistopheles’ Stout (I still can’t figure out why people don’t make a bigger deal about that beer).
  • I’m also hoping to find the elusive Bourbon Barrel-Aged Narwhal. I’m hoping to get at least 3 bottles; 2 if I can have it on tap first. I’ll probably want to age a 4-pack of regular Narwhal as well. I have 1 bottle of the 2013 vintage that I’ll probably drink when it cools down to gauge whether I want to cellar some, but something tells me I’ll want to.
  • Though it’s not my favorite I think I’ll still get a bottle or two of Abyss just to have around. Maybe I’ll keep it for trading value.
  • It would be nice if I could come across some Expedition Stout by Bell’s. I’ve never had it before. Wouldn’t mind some more Founders’ Breakfast Stout either.
  • The Bruery’s 12 Days of Christmas release this year is 7 Swans-A-Swimming is going to be an 11% Belgian Style Quad. I wasn’t too keen on 5 Golden Rings and 6 Geese-A-Laying was pretty good. I’m have high hopes for this year.
  • Stone’s Double Bastard will be released again. Not too keen on it fresh, but with the bottle I have in my cellar I might have to see if it’s worth aging longer.

Anything else I should be on the lookout for?

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Lagunitas “Imperial Red Ale”: Haven’t had this one yet so I figured I’d give it a go. Kind of a muddled aroma of grapefruit, citrus, earthy pine / floral hops, biscuit and caramel. Slight to moderate dankness. More hoppy than malty. The palate is just as muddled as the nose with hop bitterness falling on the front end with a spiced-caramel backbone. Slightly doughy. Medium-plus body with moderate bitterness and a lingering malty finish. Somewhat palatable, but mostly sloppy. Lagunitas has come a long way from their first beer. They’ve definitely mastered (or come close to mastering) the use of hops and how to appropriately balance them with malt. I’m glad I tried this, but I definitely don’t need to try it again.

Lagunitas “Imperial Red Ale”: Haven’t had this one yet so I figured I’d give it a go. Kind of a muddled aroma of grapefruit, citrus, earthy pine / floral hops, biscuit and caramel. Slight to moderate dankness. More hoppy than malty. The palate is just as muddled as the nose with hop bitterness falling on the front end with a spiced-caramel backbone. Slightly doughy. Medium-plus body with moderate bitterness and a lingering malty finish. Somewhat palatable, but mostly sloppy. Lagunitas has come a long way from their first beer. They’ve definitely mastered (or come close to mastering) the use of hops and how to appropriately balance them with malt. I’m glad I tried this, but I definitely don’t need to try it again.

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21st Amendment / Elysian “He Said” Fruit Ale / Belgian Tripel and “He Said” Fruit Ale / Baltic Porter: A collaboration between the Pumpkin King, Dick Cantwell, and the Watermelon Guy, Shaun O’Sullivan, He Said / He Said was born from each other’s memory of how they met, each drastically different stories (not unlike these two beers). Comes in a 4-pack with two cans of each He Said, but I was lucky enough to enjoy them on draft.

He Said Belgian Tripel: Brewed with pumpkin, tarragon and galangal. Ample fruity esters and phenols with plenty of clove-like and fennel spice character. Subtle yeasty character. Minimal pumpkin notes in the backend. On the palate I get more of that Belgian yeastiness with caramel sweetness. A little pumpkin with perhaps even a ginger / clove spiciness on the backend. Medium-minus body with a lively mouthfeel and a crisp, dry finish. Very palatable. Pumpkin plays only a supporting role in this beer.

He Said Baltic Porter: Brewed with pumpkin, Vietnamese cinnamon and ground caraway. A more-pronounced pumpkin character in the nose, but still subdued. Moderate spiciness with notes of cinnamon and fennel / dill seed. Subtle roasted malt / smokiness. The palate is very similar to the aroma with the malt bill falling first followed by the characteristic sweetness of a Baltic porter. Pumpkin and spice well-balanced. Medium-minus body with a creamy / silky mouthfeel, moderate carbonation and a semi-sweet finish. Highly palatable.

I was actually quite impressed by these. I don’t even know if I could classify these as pumpkin beers, but I will. These would have fit perfectly into last year’s horizontal pumpkin ale tasting I did. I was thinking about doing it again with different beers, but I don’t know if I can find enough different ones to make a new tasting. Maybe I’ll redo these.

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21st Amendment “Hell or High Watermelon” Fruit Ale / Wheat Ale: I’ve had this many times before and I probably had at least a case this year alone, but it just occurred to me I don’t have any tasting notes for it. It has a faint, pleasant wheaty character with just a touch of watermelon juice. Subtle, but present. Slight fresh-cut grass character. On the palate the watermelon is a bit more present, but doesn’t taste artificial like a Jolly Rancher®. The wheat doesn’t lend much to flavor, but does help with the body and head (obviously I was drinking this straight from the can, but I’ve enjoyed this many-a-times from proper glassware as well). Undertones of spice help balance everything out. Medium to medium-plus bodied with low-plus sweetness and a crisp, dry, effervescent finish. Very palatable, but this beer isn’t for everyone. It’s a fruit beer, so you can’t expect everyone to like it, but I look forward to it every year.
Goodbye, Summer.
Now let’s see about some Fireside Chat…

21st Amendment “Hell or High Watermelon” Fruit Ale / Wheat Ale: I’ve had this many times before and I probably had at least a case this year alone, but it just occurred to me I don’t have any tasting notes for it. It has a faint, pleasant wheaty character with just a touch of watermelon juice. Subtle, but present. Slight fresh-cut grass character. On the palate the watermelon is a bit more present, but doesn’t taste artificial like a Jolly Rancher®. The wheat doesn’t lend much to flavor, but does help with the body and head (obviously I was drinking this straight from the can, but I’ve enjoyed this many-a-times from proper glassware as well). Undertones of spice help balance everything out. Medium to medium-plus bodied with low-plus sweetness and a crisp, dry, effervescent finish. Very palatable, but this beer isn’t for everyone. It’s a fruit beer, so you can’t expect everyone to like it, but I look forward to it every year.

Goodbye, Summer.

Now let’s see about some Fireside Chat

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