The Local’s Only Beer Festival for Stockton Beer Week is tomorrow. I’m pretty excited to go. Breweries that will be represented include Bike Dog, Common Cider, Drake’s, Dust Bowl, Heretic, High Water, Knee Deep, New Glory, Schooner’s, Sudwerk, Tioga Sequoia and Track 7.
I won’t be taking any tasting notes, but I’ll have some pictures to post. I’ll be leaving for Santa Cruz for Labor Day Weekend as well, so hopefully there’ll be a trip to Sante Adairius in the near future.

The Local’s Only Beer Festival for Stockton Beer Week is tomorrow. I’m pretty excited to go. Breweries that will be represented include Bike Dog, Common Cider, Drake’s, Dust Bowl, Heretic, High Water, Knee Deep, New Glory, Schooner’s, Sudwerk, Tioga Sequoia and Track 7.

I won’t be taking any tasting notes, but I’ll have some pictures to post. I’ll be leaving for Santa Cruz for Labor Day Weekend as well, so hopefully there’ll be a trip to Sante Adairius in the near future.

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Tioga Sequoia “Smoke Chaser” Cherrywood-Smoked Barley Wine: I’ve been wanting to try this one and finally found a bottle at a local liquor store, Herbst. They usually have a pretty decent selection of beer you can’t find at BevMo! or anywhere else nearby. From the nose I do get a decent amount of that cherrywood smokiness; distinctly different from other beechwood-smoked beers I’ve had. Hoppy aroma, but I can’t quite pin the varietals. It’s a bit citrusy / tropical fruitiness with a hint of pine, but cloaked beneath the smokiness. Definitely high alpha hop varietals, especially given the 100+ IBU rating. Pleasant toffee-like maltiness with maybe a bit of rye in there, but I could be mistaken. I do get more of a rye impressions on the palate as well as more cherrywood smoke character. Toffee is more expressed on the palate as well as the hop profile. Medium-plus body with moderate bitterness falling mid to back palate and lingering resinous finish. Very palatable fresh, I’ll definitely be going back to get a few more bottles as this would make an excellent candidate for cellaring. There’s enough hop character in this to allow for gentle maturation over the next several years. I’ve been wanting to go back to Pete’s to see if they have any Midnight Lightning left as well. I don’t think cellaring it will enhance the beer any as I already think it’s fine the way it is, but just to have it for later consumption.
Tioga Sequoia has been killing it lately with these last three releases of Smoke Chaser, Midnight Lightning and Rush Hour. Haven’t had their new Catacomb Saison yet. Last year was blueberry and this year is apricot.

Tioga Sequoia “Smoke Chaser” Cherrywood-Smoked Barley Wine: I’ve been wanting to try this one and finally found a bottle at a local liquor store, Herbst. They usually have a pretty decent selection of beer you can’t find at BevMo! or anywhere else nearby. From the nose I do get a decent amount of that cherrywood smokiness; distinctly different from other beechwood-smoked beers I’ve had. Hoppy aroma, but I can’t quite pin the varietals. It’s a bit citrusy / tropical fruitiness with a hint of pine, but cloaked beneath the smokiness. Definitely high alpha hop varietals, especially given the 100+ IBU rating. Pleasant toffee-like maltiness with maybe a bit of rye in there, but I could be mistaken. I do get more of a rye impressions on the palate as well as more cherrywood smoke character. Toffee is more expressed on the palate as well as the hop profile. Medium-plus body with moderate bitterness falling mid to back palate and lingering resinous finish. Very palatable fresh, I’ll definitely be going back to get a few more bottles as this would make an excellent candidate for cellaring. There’s enough hop character in this to allow for gentle maturation over the next several years. I’ve been wanting to go back to Pete’s to see if they have any Midnight Lightning left as well. I don’t think cellaring it will enhance the beer any as I already think it’s fine the way it is, but just to have it for later consumption.

Tioga Sequoia has been killing it lately with these last three releases of Smoke Chaser, Midnight Lightning and Rush Hour. Haven’t had their new Catacomb Saison yet. Last year was blueberry and this year is apricot.

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Brooklyn Brewery “Brooklyner Weisse” Bavarian-Style Wheat Ale, “Fire and Ice” Smoked Porter, “Hammarby Syndrome” Amber Ale brewed with Spelt and Spruce Tips, “Sorachi Ace” Single Hop Belgian Saison and “Brooklyn Lager” Vienna-Style Lager: Throwback Thursday to that one time I got drunk at Brooklyn Brewery with my brother, aunt and cousin. Oddly enough beer costs tokens here you purchase at the gift shop. $5 for one or 5 for $20. You can buy just about anything for one token, but some of the more expensive beers cost two. It’s a pretty good system.

Brooklyner Weisse: Pleasant citrusy tartness with notes of orange zest and lemon citrus. Subtle fruity esters and clove phenols. Pale ale malt with bready undertones. Grainy. Earthy, herbal hops balance. Creamy, chewy body with a bright, effervescence and carbonation and a wet finish. Well executed and very palatable.

Fire and Ice: Creamy body of oats with subtle beechwood smokiness with just enough pronunciation to make itself known. Chocolatey with notes of coffee and toffee malt round out the malt bill to add enough complexity to pull away from the smoke. Undertones of vanilla sweetness. Alcohol is present, but not fusely. Medium-plus creamy body with a lingering roasted-maltiness and a resinous finish. Very palatable.

Hammarby Syndrome: Well-pronounced caramel malt bill with notes of bready and toasted malts. Slightly nutty with light amounts of dark fruit and citrus in the body and undertones of piney, herbal hops. Bready and earthy. Medium-minus creamy body with moderate bitterness and a malty finish. Palatable.

Sorachi Ace: Interesting nose and palate with lemon citrus backed by notes reminiscent of cilantro and dill. Yeasty, grassy hay with subtle spice character and lemongrass / lemon zest. Clean malt bill with fruity esters. Medium-plus doughy, yeasty with moderate hop bitterness and a lively mouthfeel. Highly palatable.

Brooklyn Lager: Couldn’t visit Brooklyn Brewery without having a Brooklyn Lager. Bready caramel malt aroma with undertones of floral and citrus hops. Very light maltiness with notes of crystal, pale, caramel, vienna and biscuit. Medium-minus thin body with a clean, dry finish. Didn’t blow my pants off, but I wasn’t expecting it to either. Palatable and very drinkable.

Verdict: Fire and Ice, Sorachi Ace, Brooklyner Weisse, Hammarby Syndrome and Brooklyn Lager. One of the best experiences I’ve ever had. I had so much fun getting to spend time with my family doing some of my favorite things; drinking, trying new things and taking tours. I’d love to go back some day.

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Stone “Tiger Cub” Saison aged in White Wine Barrels: Stockton Beer Week is in full swing. I went to The Abbey for the start of Beer Week with their Barrel Aged night featuring a pretty stellar lineup including releases from Bear Republic, Deschutes, Hangar 24 and Barrelhouse. The aroma on this was vinous and alive with bacteria, similar to lactobacillus. Notes of lemongrass, lemon citrus peel, and a peppery grains of paradise character. Stone fruit. The wine profile was reminiscent of Pinot Grigio with its crisp, bright, vibrant stone-fruit notes with a throwback to Pinot Gris’ slightly more viscous body and peppery overtones. Pleasant herbal hop undertones rounds out the profile. Slightly tart on the palate with a medium body and a lingering finish. Effervescent and well carbonated. Moderate to favorably palatable.
The story behind the name is what really drove me to try this. The brewer once told his wife he would name a beer after her once he found one worthy of her name. She has since passed, and when offered the opportunity to brew this beer he gave it her pet name, Tiger Cub.

Stone “Tiger Cub” Saison aged in White Wine Barrels: Stockton Beer Week is in full swing. I went to The Abbey for the start of Beer Week with their Barrel Aged night featuring a pretty stellar lineup including releases from Bear Republic, Deschutes, Hangar 24 and Barrelhouse. The aroma on this was vinous and alive with bacteria, similar to lactobacillus. Notes of lemongrass, lemon citrus peel, and a peppery grains of paradise character. Stone fruit. The wine profile was reminiscent of Pinot Grigio with its crisp, bright, vibrant stone-fruit notes with a throwback to Pinot Gris’ slightly more viscous body and peppery overtones. Pleasant herbal hop undertones rounds out the profile. Slightly tart on the palate with a medium body and a lingering finish. Effervescent and well carbonated. Moderate to favorably palatable.

The story behind the name is what really drove me to try this. The brewer once told his wife he would name a beer after her once he found one worthy of her name. She has since passed, and when offered the opportunity to brew this beer he gave it her pet name, Tiger Cub.

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I’m constantly shocked at the poor quality of my writing on my old reviews, but also the obvious shift in taste! […] Everything I cellar is a complete accident! Some have been around over a year. I don’t really keep up with it.” - beeritual

Yeah, I’ve looked all the way back to the first of my posts in my archive and where I’m at now is night and day. As far as cellaring goes, I’m constantly keeping my eye on my beers. I check on them every other day or so to make sure my fridge is keeping them cold, sometimes rotating bottles, date checking, etcetera.

Agree with you truly an awesome beer that doesn’t drink like an 11.5%" - luk-cha

Definitely not. With the age I definitely picked up more on the bourbon notes, but not fusely at all. The alcohol definitely creeps up on you, though. I passed out shortly after finishing the bottle lol.

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The Bruery “White Oak” Wheat Wine (2013 Vintage): One of my first efforts in cellaring. I wasn’t too sure how a wheat wine would turn out, but because 50% of this beer is aged in bourbon barrel and touts an 11.5% ABV I felt it wouldn’t hurt. I realize now that I’ve opened it the back of the label states this bottle will age gracefully for two years. This is perhaps one of my favorite regular releases by The Bruery. The nose on this is killer with beautiful notes of bourbon and accompanying barrel notes of vanilla, coconut and oak. Subtle wheat character with underlaying caramel-malt base sweetness, almost reading like toffee. Moderate fusel notes. The palate is just as pleasant; excellently balanced with a medium body, ample carbonation and a lively mouthfeel. The bourbon character really shines through on the palate, but doesn’t overwhelm and isn’t fusel-y. The alcohol does creep up on you, though.

Looking back at my notes from last year with a fresh vintage, there’s a very real possibility that my palate is just more refined than it was a year ago. The fusel notes almost seem accentuated than they were last year along with the carbonation. My best estimate would be that any hop character used to balance this beer diminished and gave way to the malt bill because I’m picking up an infinitely-larger amount of bourbon and barrel notes. The maltiness appears more pronounced, with less fruity character.

I had read that wheat wine doesn’t age very well, which prompted me to open this bottle. It wasn’t until I read the back of the label I realized this beer will aged gracefully for two years if stored properly. I couldn’t be happier with the way this beer turned out, though. One of my favorite Bruery releases stood the test of time and delivered on something I wasn’t totally expecting; a beer not with subdued, but more pronounced alcohol and barrel notes. Enjoyable nonetheless. Highly palate. If you’re considering cellaring this beer, I wouldn’t hesitate on the opportunity to do so. My only regret is that I don’t have another one in my cellar that can continue the aging process.

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Cheers to a beautiful weekend!
I’m enjoying a 2013 White Oak I’ve been cellaring for such a day. This is one of the first bottles I’ve been able to enjoy from the fruits of my labor / patience. I can’t say I’ve opened anything that’s been sitting in my cellar for this long (which isn’t very long at all; about a year). I’m dying to see how my Black Tuesday is doing, but I don’t think I’ll open one of the two bottles I have until it’s a year old. This year I’ll probably go balls deep and max out my purchase with three bottles.
-Josh

Cheers to a beautiful weekend!

I’m enjoying a 2013 White Oak I’ve been cellaring for such a day. This is one of the first bottles I’ve been able to enjoy from the fruits of my labor / patience. I can’t say I’ve opened anything that’s been sitting in my cellar for this long (which isn’t very long at all; about a year). I’m dying to see how my Black Tuesday is doing, but I don’t think I’ll open one of the two bottles I have until it’s a year old. This year I’ll probably go balls deep and max out my purchase with three bottles.

-Josh

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Goodnight Brew: A Parody for Beer People

qhrumphf:

Yeah, I just ordered a copy. I’m probably going to keep it because it’s just that awesome. And depending on how awesome it is, I’ll probably order a few more as gifts for nieces/nephews (or their parents).

This is one of the coolest things I’ve seen in a long time.

Super cute

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Franziskaner “Weissbier”, Weihenstephaner “Hefe Weissbier”, and Paulaner “Hefe-Weizen”: Taking a page out of qhrumphf's book and doing a little horizontal tasting of quintessential examples of recognized BJCP styles for palate training. Decided to give 15A a whirl; Weizen / Weissbier. A few weeks ago I visited Midtown Biergarten with my girlfriend and tried Weihenstephaner’s Korbinian Doppelbock and found the inspiration I’d been chasing after all year.

Franziskaner: Light fruity esters and phenols of banana and clove. Wheaty, grainy character present, but well-balanced with esters. Super-light, clean hop character. Undertones of bubblegum. The esters are more prominent on the palate than the nose. Slightly sweet on the front of the palate with a concentration of wheat and bright citrus character. Medium body with a creamy, lively mouthfeel with an effervescent finish.

Weihenstephaner: The most carbonated of the three. Less pronounced esters and phenols than what I found in the Franziskaner example with notes of faint banana and a whisper of clove. Wheaty. No bubblegum presence. Little to no hop presence. Banana and clove character is more pronounced on the palate than the nose, but still less so than the Franziskaner. Echoes of spicy vanilla falling mid palate with a general wheaty-graininess blanketing the palate. Subtle sweet malt character. Undertones of tart citrus. Medium bodied with a minimal creaminess, lively mouthfeel and a light effervescent finish.

Paulaner: The darkest of the three. Minimal to moderate fruity esters and phenols produce the characteristic banana-y clove profile. Getting an Munich-like maltiness that imparts a really mild nuttiness, unique to this beer in my flight. Minimal wheat character compared to the others. More Munich malt character on the palate backed by notes of wheat and mild esters and phenols. Little to no sweetness on the palate. Moderate citrus on the front of the palate with breadiness falling mid palate and a lightly-kilned malt presence falling on the backend. Medium body with moderate creaminess, lively mouthfeel and a lightly effervescent finish.

Verdict: Franziskaner, Weihenstephaner, Paulaner. With my previous experiences in the style, I felt the Franziskaner was the most-representative of the style in line with the BJCP. The addition of the Munich-like maltiness in the Paulaner threw me off, something I was not expecting especially after reviewing the BJCP style guidelines. That isn’t to say I didn’t find it enjoyable. It was just unexpected and not something I was looking for. And though the Weihenstephaner was palatable, I felt it lacked the esters and phenol character I enjoy so much about Hefeweizens.

With three distinguished German breweries such as these, it goes without saying (but worth mentioning for those unfamiliar) that these were brewed according to Purity Law.

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I’ve been really into pouring my beer into a glass right down the center lately. I heard it gave really good head retention so I started trying it and I gotta say I’ve gotten some pretty good results. Obviously not every beer is brewed with the intention of having a good head. A lot of the sours I’ve been drinking lately don’t often have head. I’ve had good success with stouts, some IPA, and some darker, maltier beers like strong ales. Hefes would work really well for this type of pour as well.

Usually, when you work in a bar, you want to pour the beer down the side of the glass and as you get to about 2/3 full you want to tilt the glass upright and pour right down the center to develop head. This is a simple, fast solution to pouring a beer with head. I’ve found that head retention is minimal with this type of pour and it dissipates fairly quickly. Sometimes waiting for a drink isn’t in the cards and I get that.

When I’m at home though, I like pouring right down the middle of the glass. It takes longer, pouring a glass of beer and 3/4 of it turn to foam, letting it settle, then pouring a second time, letting it settle again, and sometimes pouring a third time to top it off. There’s a little extra work and wait time involved with such an aggressive pour, but I’ve found the head retention to be amazing. This pour I did with this Sierra Nevada / Ninkasi collaboration Double Latte turned out amazing and wound up looking like a cappuccino (how appropriate).

How do you pour your beer? Give this pour a try if you’ve never done it before. Do you think it made a difference?

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